Apple Music

Charlie Sloth Leaves BBC for Apple Music

Drake and Charlie Sloth

Drake and Charlie Sloth
Drake and Charlie Sloth (Source: BBC)

Charlie Sloth, one of the leading hip-hop radio DJs in the UK, has announced that he’s leaving BBC Radio for Apple Music.

Sloth, who has been with the network for a decade, has hosted shows on Radio 1 and 1Xtra. His rap freestyle segment “Fire in the Booth” is globally renowned. The segment has featured appearances from Drake, Stormzy, Big Shaq, and many more.

It hasn’t been revealed what his role at Apple Music will be, but there is speculation that he will be hosting a new show on Beats 1 and contributing to the platform’s playlists.

Sloth isn’t the only BBC host to leave for Apple Music. In 2015, Zane Lowe departed the network to launch a show on Beats 1.

Sloth posted the following message on Instagram:

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After almost 10 years of dedicating my life to BBC radio 1xtra & Radio 1 and achieving everything I set out to I’ve decided the time has come to leave the BBC and seek a new challenge. I want to thank everybody who has listened to me over the years and supported me in everything I have done I love you and the journey continues. I also want to say a huge thank you to the following people for always believing in me and supporting me while at the Bbc. Dellessa James Alex lawless Carlene Morlese Rob little john Julie Shepherd Rebecca frank Joe Harland Rhys Hughes Lim La Richards Janine kempadoo Hermet Chadha Rachal Mcalroy Alex Rata Lucy Hickling And especially Ben cooper for being a great leader and for giving me all the opportunities he has to prove myself I’m forever grateful I hope all my colleagues at 1xtra and radio 1 keep up the amazing work it’s been an incredible place to work and I’m honoured to have done so. I joined the BBC as a boy and I leave as a man. Together we have created some moments that will live forever. Charlie Sloth ❤️❤️❤️❤️ ANNOUNCEMENT ON WHATS NEXT COMING SOON ❤️

A post shared by Charlie Sloth (@charliesloth) on

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Apple Music Can Now Stream Previously Unlicensed Remixes and DJ Mixes

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Dubset has announced a partnership that will allow Apple Music to stream remixes and DJ mixes that had previously been absent due to copyright issues, Billboard reports.
 
The website writes:
 
“Dubset is a digital distributor that delivers content to digital music services. But unlike other digital distributors, Dubset will use a proprietary technology called MixBank to analyze a remix or long-form DJ mix file, identify recordings inside the file, and properly pay both record labels and music publishers.”
 
The partnership could be a game changer because licensing remixes and mixes is incredibly complex. According to Dubset CEO Stephen White, a typical mix has 25 to 30 songs that require payments to 25 to 30 record labels and anywhere from two to ten publishers for each track. As Billboard points out, that could be more than 600 different rights holders.
 
Not all remixes and mixes will be allowed on Apple Music, though.
 
According to Billboard: “Once an uploaded mix is analyzed, a process White says takes about 15 minutes for a 60-minute file, MixBank checks the recordings, as well as its underlying composition, against the controls and restrictions set by rights holders. For example, rights holders can blacklist an artist, album, or track. They can create a rule to limit the length of a song used in a remix or mix. Rights holders can prevent an artist from being associated with certain other artists and they can control which territories will and will not get the content. Then there’s an optional review process at the end so a rights holder can give a final approval for the file before it is distributed.”
 
If the remix or mix passes the tests, the remixer or DJ is notified and can select the desired distributors (others are coming soon). If the content fails the tests, the creator receives an explanation and a chance to make the necessary changes before submitting it again.
 
But here’s where it really gets interesting. According to Billboard, even the remixer or DJ will get a share of the earnings.
 
“In many ways, Dubset is like any other distributor. The service pays Dubset for the content. Dubset then figures out which label and publishers to pay. It retains a percentage of revenue for the service and pays the creator (the remixer or DJ) a share of revenue (White won’t provide the specific amount of each). Major labels and independent labels are paid at the same rates. Big DJs and small DJs also earn the same rates.”
 
“The goal is to bring this to all 400 distributors worldwide,” White told Billboard. “When you think about unlocking these millions of hours of content being created, it’s significant monetization for the industry.”
 
DJs and rights holders can sign up here.
 
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