Pensado’s Place

Murda Beatz Breaks Down His Hitmaking Success On Pensado’s Place

Multi-platinum producer Murda Beatz recently sat down with the Pensado’s Place YouTube show for a glimpse into his career.

The 25-year-old Canadian beatmaker has produced ten top 10 singles in the past three years. He released back-to-back hits in 2017 and 2018 with Migos, Cardi B, and Nicki Minaj‘s “Motorsport” and Drake‘s “Nice For What”.

Murda Beatz discusses his production inspirations, working with Drake, how to make it as a “Youtube producer” in the social media age, and more. He also talks about how Toronto has been able to maintain creative domination over much of hip-hop music and culture.

Watch the interview above.

Related Post: Ricky Reed Explains How Lizzo’s ‘Truth Hurts’ Was Produced

Ricky Reed Explains How Lizzo’s ‘Truth Hurts’ Was Produced

Ricky Reed

After a year that feels like it was powered by Lizzo, the latest episode of Pensado’s Place reveals the secrets of her success. Ricky Reed, the veteran producer/songwriter behind the now three-time Grammy-nominated single “Truth Hurts,” (and four other tracks on Cuz I Love You) returns as a guest to the videocast to break down the methods behind the ubiquitous song’s popularity. As a bonus, he discussed what keeps him — an ever-busy and platinum-selling (Jason Derulo and Snoop Dogg, “Talk Dirty”) creative and father — grounded and balanced.

Regarding “Truth Hurts,” it’s the idea of cutting almost everything from the original demo of the track save a two-bar piano intro that actually makes the final production truly connect. “When I heard that bit [of music], I heard an emotion in it that was really rich and hard to define. Building a song around it allowed me to tease out all of the magic that was there.”

If also looking to hear about how having a short attention span, being emotionally aware and available, and yes, learning Spanish, aid him in his personal and professional life, this episode is worth checking out.

Watch the full interview above.

Related Post: Watch Lizzo’s ‘Good As Hell’ Video

Ben Billion$ Talks All Things Production on ‘Pensado’s Place’

Ben Billion$
Ben Billion$ (Source: Instagram)

Multi-platinum producer Ben Billion$ recently sat down with the Pensado’s Place YouTube show.

Based in Miami, Ben is best known for producing hits like Future‘s “Low Life,” Yo Gotti‘s “Down in the DM,” Maroon 5‘s “What Lovers Do,” and The Weeknd‘s “Often.” Most recently, Ben scored placements on DJ Khaled‘s new album Father of Asahd, including “You Stay,” which was one of DJcity’s most downloaded tracks of May.

Ben discussed a number of topics in the interview, such as starting out as an engineer, his signature “low end” sound, his definition of “strip club drums,” using live instrumentation, the importance of being humble, and more.

Watch the interview below.

Related Post: D.A. Doman: One of Hip-Hop’s Most In-Demand Producers

Producer Louis Bell Talks Working With Post Malone and More

Louis Bell

Chart-topping producer Louis Bell sat down for an interview on the music production show Pensado’s Place. Bell co-wrote and co-produced many of the songs on Post Malone‘s album beerbongs & bentleys, including the hits “rockstar” featuring 21 Savage and “Better Now.” The Boston native also worked with Post on “Wow.” and Preme‘s “Jackie Chan.”

In the interview, Bell talks about his studio sessions with Post before discussing his creative process, favorite plug-ins and more.

On creativity:

“I think that’s what creativity is, is taking something so small and being able to manipulate it and bend it and stretch it out, and, without watering it down. That’s the key.”

On what he looks for in his artists’ vocals:

“Feel, energy, vibe, and emotion. There’s no app yet that can fix that stuff, so that’s why I demand that.”

On what makes Post Malone unique:

“He sounds like he has so much soul and pain… and just hearing him sing, I just felt everything he was saying… There’s not one line that he sings, that he’s just singing to sing it.”

Watch the full interview above (it begins at the 7:56 mark).

Related: Chart-Topping Engineer Manny Marroquin Talks Working With Post Malone and More

A-Trak Discusses How Being a DJ Helps Him as a Producer

A-Trak
A-Trak at Holy Ship! 10.0. (Credit: Miranda McDonald Photography)

Fresh off the release of his single “Ride For Me” featuring Young Thug and 24hrs, A-Trak sat down with the legendary Pensado’s Place show.

Back in December, the Fool’s Gold chief got a chance to tell his story in a comprehensive interview with Complex’s Blueprint series. This time, A-Trak focused mostly on music production and how DJing has influenced his work in that realm.

On how being a DJ and turntablist has helped him as a producer:

“My DJing definitely informs my production. The obvious way to explain that is just like, DJs know what works well in the clubs. So there’s a bit of that, but even on a very, an almost unconscious level, some of the programming that I do, if I’m chopping up a sound, my friends will say that I make it sound like it’s a scratch. I don’t even realize it, but my ear is so accustomed to sound manipulation and certain patterns. … But the thing that’s been interesting for me in recent years is I feel I’ve learned how to produce my scratching. So there’s a lot of full circle things going on … .”

On his limitations as a producer:

“One of the great lessons for me as I went more into production was to accept my limitations. It’s hard, and I’m stubborn, and I like to know how to do everything, but there are certain things that I’m not as good at. And I definitely still believe that I’m a DJ who got into producing, who got into remixing, who got into running a label, all these other things. And when I was learning how to produce, at first I really wanted to do everything myself. … I would drive people crazy, and by the way, even now today I’m a month and a half late delivering a remix. Sometimes I’ve very late delivering things because I stubbornly wanna do it my way or [do it] myself. And again, I’m in my element when I’m DJing. When I’m producing, I’m still trying to get the ideas out of my head, and sometimes there’s roadblocks.”

Watch the interview below.

Related: A-Trak Tells His Story in Comprehensive Interview

Watch: Legendary Radio Hosts and DJs the Baka Boyz Reflect on Their Careers

The Baka Boyz

The Baka Boyz
Nick and Eric V a.k.a. the Baka Boyz / YouTube

Legendary radio hosts and DJs Nick and Eric Vidal, a.k.a. the Baka Boyz, were recently guests on the Pensado’s Place show.

Originally from Bakersfield, California, the brothers first achieved fame in the early ’90s on Los Angeles’ Power 106. Their shows Friday Nite Flavas and World Famous Roll Call revolutionized radio in Los Angeles and helped make Power a force in hip-hop.

Around the same time, the Baka Boyz also made a name for themselves as producers, working with Los Angeles artists like The Pharcyde, Cypress Hill, House of Pain, Kid Frost, and Volume 10.

Later in their careers, the duo gave breaks to future Los Angeles radio icons Big Boy, Fuzzy Fantabulous, and DJ E-Man. The Baka Boyz continue to hold it down on the airwaves with their nationally syndicated show, the Hip-Hop Master Mix. As Pensado’s Place puts it, the duo is “radio royalty.”

Like most Pensado’s Place episodes, the Baka Boyz reflected on their careers from start to finish. They also discussed the state of terrestrial radio, their current projects, among other topics.

On how Los Angeles’ KDAY radio station inspired them:

“We’d get on our two-story house on the roof with a Fisher boombox and turn it all the way up, trying to just record whatever was playing because we were blown away by what they were doing, all the music they were playing. So we’d take that tape and then we’d go to LA and go to the record store … and we’d come back with $300 worth of records for the club …”

On transforming Power 106’s newsroom into a mixroom, which transformed radio in Los Angeles:

“At the time — [Power] — they didn’t have a mix room. Everybody pre-recorded mixes; it was all reel-to-reel. So Power’s Rick asked us, he’s like, ‘So you guys gotta record your mixes on reel-to-reel and turn ’em in.’ I said, ‘Nah, we don’t do that. We do live.’ He’s like, ‘What if it skips?’ I said, ‘Then it skips; it’s not the end of the world. [laughs] … We had to have the engineer retrofit the newsroom and make it a mixroom.”

On being Latin American DJs in a primarily black genre:

“We’re just hip-hop DJs, and there was no color to hip-hop DJs, and we just reflected that. We were passionate about the music. We were in tune with what was going on in the streets and in the studios because we were producing at that time.”

On the current state of terrestrial radio:

“[The stations] are stuck in their ways of what they wanna do and they have to recreate the wheel with radio to make it cool again cuz it’s not cool. … They think only because you listen to that station, you only listen to this kind of music … People like to listen to different things. … [The stations] want to put you in a box, and the box is broken. That mold is old; it needs to go away.”

Watch the inspiring convo below.

Related: Emmis to Sell Power 106 to Meruelo Group

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